Make your reservations for Sunday, August 9 Worship

Seating is limited. If the service you prefer to attend is full please try another one.

 
 
 
O U R   C H U R C H
 

We are a church family rooted in Christ and growing in grace.

At Wesley Chapel, it is our mission to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. We do this by focusing on four areas: Worship, Faith Development, Serving, and Generosity. We live together as people of faith to grow as disciples in each of these four areas.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
W H A T   W E   D O 

Our Mission

Serve the Church

When we serve we are being like Jesus. Jesus calls us to serve within our faith community so that we can grow in our faith and be equipped to go into the world to share the love of God with all people. The primary areas of Serve Here are Hospitality and Food Service. Serving at Wesley Chapel also includes other ministry areas such as Worship, Faith Development, and Facility Team just to name a few. There are always opportunities to serve and we would love to have you connected to Wesley Chapel through service.

 
 
 

Serve the City

We believe serving those around us is central to growing in our relationship with God. As disciples of Jesus Christ, we serve our local communities in Southern Indiana.
 
 

Serve the World

We are a church on mission to go into the world and share the hope of Jesus. Through local and global ministry partnerships, we are working diligently to be the hands and feet of God.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A B O U T
we are family.
 
 
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New Here?

Join us for worship on Sundays at 8:30 am or 11:00 am. Our campus is located in the heart of Floyd County, Indiana. No matter who you are, or where you’ve been, we welcome you with open arms.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mission
& Vision
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Our
Ministries
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
M I S S I O N
 
We are traveling this journey of faith together, developing the character of Jesus within, and sharing the love of God with our community.

 

Tony Alstott

Lead Pastor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
L E A D E R S H I P

Our Team

 
Tony Alstott
Lead Pastor
 
 
Cory Feuerbacher
Director of Worship +
Director of 20’s/30’s Ministry
 
 
Becky Perkins
Director of Faith Development
 
 
Peter Williams
Associate Pastor
In charge of Youth and Mission
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
C H U R C H   M E D I A

Latest Sermon Series

 
 
 
 
 
 

Cue the Eagle

“Run to the roar means facing my pain and fears and trusting God to help me with those fears. As a part of that, I wanted to deepen my relationship with God, and in return He provided me with strength. I ask God for strength many days and he gives it to me along with hope of eternal life.”


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Three Generations Impacted

“In my early 20’s I was going through rough times. I was trying to figure out what to do to better myself and get back on track to get out of the rut I was in. I asked my mother if she would be interested in trying out Wesley Chapel, and we went that next Sunday and the rest is history. We fell in love with the church from that point on. I loved the church, and the feeling of family was important to us. We got that feeling from the beginning.”


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A Church to Call Home

“We felt very loved, there was a lot of grace, not judgement. Our lives at that time were a real mess. I wouldn’t wish any family to go through that, but we went through it. And what we found as we had that journey, and we would share that journey, the more and more love we got. It almost intensified and helped us through that time. Peoples lives are messy, and if you don’t have a mess, just wait because there will be one.


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W E S L E Y   C H A P E L   B L O G

Recent Articles

Parting Ways

Written by Rhonda Alstott
One of the things I’ve personally been working on during this pandemic is my health by focusing on adding healthier foods and more steps to my day. The benefit of this is I have been losing weight. The baggier fit of my clothes, renewed energy and my bathroom scale have been my positive reinforcements in this. The past two days I’ve had my scale give me a hard time. It has told me I have dropped 20 pounds in two days. Now I love good news, but this is great news. Almost too good to be true, so I changed the battery. Same weight…hm… I go to the kitchen and grab a 5 pound bag of flour. I learn my scale has decided to give me faulty information and seems to be lying. My scale and I are parting ways after an 18 year relationship because it’s broken and can’t give me accurate information. I usually donate my belongings to the Salvation Army when I get something new, but sadly I cannot do this with my scale. It will lead the next unsuspecting person astray as well and it might not be for just a few days.

I don’t know about you, but I feel like every day I experience whiplash from hearing something different from the day before…don’t wear a mask/wear a mask, children don’t transmit COVID/children can transmit COVID, don’t trust the numbers/trust the numbers… the list goes on and on. What I do know is that misinformation and conspiracy theories travel faster than the virus itself. I’ve decided that when it comes to deciding whether something is a truth or a lie, I better wait before I post, like, or share because real understanding comes with time. That was true of the prophets and prophecies in scripture. Time showed whether a prophet was telling the truth and time showed whether the prophecy was true. Scripture gives us plenty of examples of what happened to those that were involved in falsehood.

 

When I go back to Genesis and see the story of where sin entered the world (Genesis 3), the serpent enters the scene questioning Eve regarding God’s instructions. When looking at this I’ve always focused on how the serpent took God’s instructions and manipulated them in a way that caused Eve and Adam to partake from the tree causing sin to enter the world, but recently I’ve realized there’s another issue I may have overlooked. A lesson for me is to pause and think that maybe a broader issue than eating the fruit is the issue of who they chose to listen to. Who we listen to is important. Listening to the serpent as authority cost them everything.

 

My question for all of us is this, whose voice are you listening to as your authority?

 

In John 8:44, Jesus tells us himself that Satan is the father of lies. I have spent the past few years of my personal study with scripture in the gospels because it is there that I see the very words of Jesus, a savior I choose to follow. It is in the gospels I see Jesus speak grace and truth into his community where political and religious systems had misrepresented His Father. I see Jesus confront the lies that had been perpetuated by the father of lies and dismantle some strongly held beliefs of his time. Did it cause some discomfort? It sure did. That, along with God’s plan of redemption for us, is what got him arrested, beaten, and killed. God’s plan for redemption was for all nations and people. He has invited us into that work when He invites us into a personal relationship with him. It was his charge to us from the mountaintop in Matthew 28 in giving us His Great Commission.

 

Confession time… there was a time in my personal life that I valued the acquiring of knowledge over my relationship with Christ and those around me. Why? Truth be known, I’ve always had this misconception that knowledge is power. Arguments can be made for or against, but my faith journey has painfully taught me that doing what Jesus says is the real power, not knowledge. Following his voice and doing what His Spirit shows me is the truth I cling to these days. It’s the only comfort I have on some days when I see so much pain and heartbreak inflicted on social media. I ask all of us these two questions:

 

Whose Voice are you listening to?

 

Could I be participating in misleading others in what I share?

 

So for now, I am seeking and setting my mind on things above (Col 3:1-2). I’m focusing on my life that is hidden with Christ and not on the special knowledge some claim to have on social media (Col 3:3). And I’m parting ways with anger, wrath, malice, slander and obscene talk and lies with the help of the Holy Spirit (Col 3:8-9). I’m reading, fact checking, and parting ways with the misuse of knowledge and lies on social and mainstream media, just like I’m parting ways with a scale that can’t tell me the truth, even if I like what it’s saying.

 
 
 

Peace-

Rhonda


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Humility or Defensiveness: Racism and the Human Reaction

Written by Pastor Tony Alstott
 

If someone asked you if you were a racist, how would you respond?  Most of us would respond from a position of defensiveness.  We are taught that being a racist is a bad thing so we have worked hard to not be a racist.  While working hard not to be racists, we have well-developed arguments as to why we are not racists.  Our arguments to defend that we are not racists are developed from a position of defensiveness. 

If you would have asked me if I was a racist when I was 20 years old I would emphatically have told you no.   Denny and Reggie were some of my best friends.  We often met at the elementary school which was between our neighborhoods.  As kids, we played on the playground.  As teenagers, we played basketball on the outdoor goals at the school.  In middle school, Jamie and I became friends when we played football and ran track together.  When we were able to drive we went to the park, to baseball games, and to King’s Island.  When I was 19, we even took a trip to New York City together just because we could.  We freely went into each other’s homes.  I was invited to gatherings where I would be the only white person.  I never felt uncomfortable or out of place.

A racist is someone who hates black people.  I do not hate black people.  A racist is someone who kills black people because they were black.  I do not kill anyone.  A racist is someone who joins the Ku Klux Klan and terrorizes black people.  I did not join the KKK nor do I terrorize black people.  I was not a racist because I had black friends that I would love and defend.  I did not have a prejudiced bone in my body.

When I was in college, a history teacher challenged me to reflect on my views and discover my prejudices.  I told the teacher I was not prejudiced.  He pushed back with questions that led me to discover stereotypes that I held about groups of people. Rich people were smart.  People who went to college had ambition. Of course I had never said any of this out loud before but the conversation forced me to self-reflect.  My realization that I believed rich people were smart also led to an underlying belief that poor people were not as smart.  By thinking that people who went to college had ambition gave me the false belief that people who didn’t go to college didn’t have ambition.  These stereotypes were prejudices.  Unconsciously these prejudices impacted my attitudes, words and actions.  It was one of those “a-ha” moments that changed my life.  I would never be able to work on my prejudiced thoughts, words, and behaviors until I was willing to admit that I had them.  I had prejudices.

So the question I had to ask myself wasn’t, “Do I have racists thoughts?”  The question I began to ask was, “What racist thoughts did I have?” 

Today I’m 57 years old.  I have spent a lifetime trying to remove prejudice and stereotypes from my life.  I believe that if I humble myself, I can learn something from any other person on the planet whether or not they are rich or college educated.  I can learn people’s stories.  I can discover that we all have hopes, fears, and feelings.  I have also discovered new stereotypes that emerge in my life that I need to ponder, identify, and confront. 

Am I a racist?  If I take a position of defensiveness I would give you an emphatic no and tell you all the reasons why I am not a racist.  The result of my response would be that the conversation is concluded.  A direct question was given a direct and decisive answer.  However, if I take a position of humility, I’m prepared to discuss with you how I may be holding some racist views that are systemic in the society I live in.  With the position of humility, I may be able to self-reflect and remove some unconscious racist stereotypes so that I may be less racist than before.  Today if you ask me if I’m a racist, my response is, “I’m working toward the goal of being anti-racist.”  An anti-racist is someone who is against racist ideas and systems, first from within himself or herself, and then in society. 

Are you a racist?  If you answer no and give me a wonderful list about how you are not a racist, then I know you are answering from a position of defensiveness.  If you answer, “I hope not,” and are willing to self-reflect to discover if you hold any racist views, then you are answering from a position of humility and you are ready to identify and confront racist views you may be unconsciously holding.

If you would like to be join me in the journey of becoming an anti-racist, Dr. Erica Lawrence and I will be leading a four-week discussion on “Becoming an Anti-Racist.”

Each session will begin at 6:30 p.m.

August 6: I live in a racist society

August 13: I am not a racist

August 20: The Real Message

August 27: Becoming an anti-racist

Click here to register for the class.


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Praying for a Miracle that isn’t Coming

Written by Ahnya Evinger
 

A verse that God placed in the forefront of my life four years ago this summer is Romans 5:1-5. “Therefore, since we have been justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ. Through him we have also obtained access by faith into the grace in which we stand, and we rejoice in hope of the glory of God. Not only that, but we rejoice in our suffering, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not disappoint, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts through the Holy Spirit who has been given to us.”

I heard a gentleman deliver a message on the passage at our Indiana Annual Conference, and the words were seared into my heart and mind. Hope does not disappoint.

This is the verse I clung to that fall when I was diagnosed with a heart condition called sick sinus syndrome. Although this syndrome has affected me my whole life, I did not have a name or diagnosis for it. My entire life, I would experience syncope where I would lose consciousness. Every time I woke up, I was confused and tired. I learned how to recognize the signs before I would drop, but I was not always able to prevent it. One Christmas break, I had to go to the emergency room to get seven stitches above my eyebrow because I cut it open when I fell. Doctors throughout my life had different suggestions about why I was passing out, but it wasn’t until I was 28 that we finally had the data to make a diagnosis.

My heart stopped. “Paused” was the word used by medical professionals, but from the flat line on the printout my cardiologist was showing me as he explained what happened, I concluded it meant my heart stopped. Sometimes, it was only part of my heart that didn’t beat, but really, you need both parts to beat in order to stay conscious (and alive). My heart is strong and healthy, but the electric current that runs through it is faulty.

Fortunately, there is medical technology that corrects this problem my heart has. It is called a pacemaker and is actually very common (in people over the age of 28 apparently….not under). Unfortunately, my cardiologist did not want to insert a pacemaker based on the little data he had. He had only witnessed one of these incidents. He implanted a loop monitor to record the data on my heartbeat and instructed me to live life as normal.

Do you know how hard it is to go about life as normal when you find out that your heart has a problem with it that causes it to randomly stop? My mind reeled. Fear gripped me. I quit exercising. I had anxiety about every weird feeling inside of my body which usually had more to do with indigestion than heart palpitations. I tried to focus on work, school, and family, but I was usually too distracted overanalyzing my predicament. I had prayed for a diagnosis and a fix, but God answered it with wait. Wait for the wisdom of the doctor and medical team. Wait for the pacemaker. Wait.

I prayed for the miracle of life. Joe and I had been talking about children, and I wanted to be a mom so desperately. With the diagnosis of sick sinus syndrome, my doctor was very stern about pregnancy prevention. My cardiovascular system would put the baby and me in danger. Wait. Wait until we figure out the severity of the heart pauses. Wait until a pacemaker is inserted. Wait.

The following spring, enough data had been collected for a pacemaker to be inserted. My doctor cleared me of any restrictions except scuba diving too deep and shooting a rifle left handed. (Who knew the perils?) That was over three years ago. It feels like an eternity to me when you are praying for the miracle of life and the miracle isn’t coming.

Waiting is hard. Waiting has turned into four years. Waiting has become a rollercoaster of hope and disappointment every month. Waiting has turned into frustration and tears. This is so contrary to the verse I whisper over and over again, “Hope does not disappoint.” I am afraid to hope because the disappointment is so hard to face. Hope. Wait. I’m tired.

“But they who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint.” Isaiah 40:31

Lord, I continue to pray for miracles, but I realize that my hope is not in this life but rather the eternal life you provide. May I put away my selfish ambitions of this world and be renewed in You for Your purposes. Lead me. Direct my path. Comfort me in my waiting. Equip me to serve you. Please let me not lose faith in your miracles, and may I recognize your miracles each day. Amen.

 


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A   F A V O R I T E   R E A D  
 

Forgotten God: Reversing our tragic neglect of the Holy Spirit. 

A follow up to the profound message of Crazy Love, Pastor Francis Chan offers a compelling invitation to understand, embrace, and follow the Holy Spirit’s direction in our lives.
 
In the name of the Father, the Son, and … the Holy Spirit. We pray in the name of all three, but how often do we live with an awareness of only the first two? As Jesus ascended into heaven, He promised to send the Holy Spirit—the Helper—so that we could be true and living witnesses for Christ. Unfortunately, today’s church has admired the gift but neglected to open it.
 
Breakthrough author Francis Chan rips away paper and bows to get at the true source of the church’s power—the Holy Spirit. Chan contends that we’ve ignored the Spirit for far too long, and we are reaping the disastrous results. Thorough scriptural support and compelling narrative form Chan’s invitation to stop and remember the One we’ve forgotten, the Spirit of the living God.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Contact Info

Address: 2100 Highway 150
Floyds Knobs, Indiana 47119
Phone: 812.944.2570
Email: wesley@wesleychapel.org