O U R   C H U R C H
 

We are a church family rooted in Christ and growing in grace.

At Wesley Chapel, it is our mission to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. We do this by focusing on four areas: Worship, Faith Development, Serving, and Generosity. We live together as people of faith to grow as disciples in each of these four areas.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
W H A T   W E   D O 

Our Mission

Serve the Church

When we serve we are being like Jesus. Jesus calls us to serve within our faith community so that we can grow in our faith and be equipped to go into the world to share the love of God with all people. The primary areas of Serve Here are Hospitality and Food Service. Serving at Wesley Chapel also includes other ministry areas such as Worship, Faith Development, and Facility Team just to name a few. There are always opportunities to serve and we would love to have you connected to Wesley Chapel through service.

 
 
 

Serve the City

We believe serving those around us is central to growing in our relationship with God. As disciples of Jesus Christ, we serve our local communities in Southern Indiana.
 
 

Serve the World

We are a church on mission to go into the world and share the hope of Jesus. Through local and global ministry partnerships, we are working diligently to be the hands and feet of God.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A B O U T
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New Here?

Join us for worship on Sundays at 8:30 am or 11:00 am. Our campus is located in the heart of Floyd County, Indiana. No matter who you are, or where you’ve been, we welcome you with open arms.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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M I S S I O N
 
We are traveling this journey of faith together, developing the character of Jesus within, and sharing the love of God with our community.

 

Tony Alstott

Lead Pastor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
L E A D E R S H I P

Our Team

 
Tony Alstott
Lead Pastor
 
 
Cory Feuerbacher
Director of Worship +
Director of 20s/30s Ministry
 
 
Becky Perkins
Director of Faith 
 
 
Peter Williams
Associate Pastor
In charge of Youth and Mission
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
C H U R C H   M E D I A

Latest Sermon Series

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
W E S L E Y   C H A P E L   B L O G

Recent Articles

Asking Forgiveness Instead of Permission is Not Easier

Written by Tony Alstott

“It’s easier to ask forgiveness instead of permission,” has become a common statement that I first heard years ago.  I have been hearing it more and more lately to the point that it seems to have become a part of our American culture.  The first time I heard it I immediately felt uncomfortable.  I did not stop to analyze why until recently.

 

First, the statement implies that permission should be asked before proceeding with the action you plan to do.  Your action somehow crosses a boundary that would be a concern to the person you would eventually need to ask forgiveness from.  Not asking permission when you know you should ask permission is a willful and premeditated act.  You have thought about it beforehand and you made the decision not to ask permission.  It would be better to ask permission first rather than taking the easy way.

 

Second, it is deceptive.  When you do something without asking permission you are going behind someone’s back to accomplish something you want to do.  You do it without the person knowing about it until it is already done.  Deception is a form of lying by withholding the truth. It would be better to be honest up front by asking permission instead of being deceptive and then later asking for forgiveness.

 

Third, the course of action creates distrust.  You have the opportunity to be trustworthy by asking permission before moving forward with your intended action.  By intentionally not asking permission first, you have created distrust.  It would be better to ask permission to create on ongoing relationship of trust instead of moving forward with your action. 

 

Fourth, you devalue the person when you choose not to ask permission.  You have decided that what you want to accomplish is more important than the person whose permission you need to ask.  It would be better to ask permission to show that you value the person more than the task you want to accomplish.

 

Fifth, when you ask forgiveness for something when you could have asked permission first, your apology is empty.  You really aren’t sorry for what you did.  You are glad you did it.  You feel justified in doing it.  You did it without consideration of the person you would hurt or the boundary you would cross.  You are really not asking forgiveness at all.  It would be better to care enough to ask permission.

 

God has called me to point people to God and point Christians to the mission field.  Forgiveness is an important part of Christianity.  Jesus forgave us.  We are to forgive one another.  When we ask someone to forgive us, there is an expectation that they must forgive us if we are Christian.  When we willingly cross a boundary without asking permission, with the intent of asking forgiveness, what are we doing?  Are we taking advantage of the person knowing that they must forgive as Jesus forgave?  Are we being selfish, seeking our own gain, at the expense of others?  Is it really easier to ask forgiveness than permission?  Is taking the easy way the goal of the Christian believer?  Perhaps asking forgiveness instead of permission may be easier for the short term but not for the long term.  When we take advantage of other people through deceptive means, I would say that it is harder rather than easier.  It’s easier to ask permission than it is to mend a broken relationship.  It’s easier to build trust than it is to earn the trust of the one you have deceived.  

 

Jesus said to love God and love one another.  Asking forgiveness instead of asking permission is not how we love one another.  Peter encourages us to “love one another deeply from the heart” (1 Peter 1:22). We love one another by being honest, by respecting boundaries, and by valuing people as God’s handiwork. 

 


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Renewing Your Mind While Watching Someone You Love Suffer

Written by Laura Swessel

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12

Dementia is such a cruel and mysterious disease, especially for the family and friends of those afflicted with it.  Every phase presents you with a totally different person.  I have watched one of the most independent women – military veteran (one of the first female Air Force officers), young widow (losing her husband at age 48 when I was 19, and my brother was only 10 years old), brilliant musician, and role model – struggle with this disease for almost 5 years (probably longer as I look back and reflect on what I now know are early signs).  First, it seemed like she had a hard time concentrating, always starting something new before completing the task at hand, which led to a very cluttered household – atypical of the woman who raised me.  Then, it was minor forgetfulness – missing an appointment or not remembering an outing we had taken a few months back.  Now, recalling what she had for breakfast just a few hours later is a major task.  The mystery (or maybe the blessing) of what it has not robbed from her is her love for and ability to do crossword puzzles and Sodoku and (of course) to play the organ.

The purpose of Paul’s letter to the Romans is to give a summary of all that is required to live a life that is pleasing to God, especially in times of trouble.  Romans 12:12 gives three traits (joy, patience and faithfulness) and a context for each of them.  The second and third items are quite easy to relate to a caregiver’s concerns for a loved one suffering from dementia.  Patience in affliction is most definitely needed as your loved one struggles to come up with the correct words, tries to pull a memory out of muddled thoughts, or just simply attempts to complete a basic task.

Being “faithful in prayer” has taken on many different forms throughout this process.  First, there is the obvious in that I pray every day that medical advances will slow down the progression of the disease or at least lessen her anxiety.  Secondly, as I gradually took over her financial and medical decisions, I began (and continue) to pray for guidance.  Lastly, I pray for the ability to navigate the many changes in her abilities and also to find creative ways to encourage her and to accentuate the strengths and skills she still possesses.

Being “joyful in hope”, though, is probably the most difficult of the three.  What does that mean and how does it apply to someone who is dealing with a chronic, progressively debilitating disease like dementia?  For me, the hope lies in the hope that advancements in the treatment and prevention of dementia will mean that another generation will not have to suffer or watch a loved one suffer with the disease.

I’d like to close by including one other verse. 1 Thessalonians 5:18 says, “Give thanks in all circumstances”.  I am grateful that my mother’s dementia has not progressed as quickly as others.  I am also thankful for the incredible community of other caregivers I have met while visiting my mother – many of them not as fortunate as I am.  My mother’s long-term memory is still mostly intact.  So, we can reminisce about events and activities we have experienced together, and she can still tell me stories about her childhood and early adulthood.  Although, I wish I would have started this project earlier, the situation of other people who can no longer share these memories with their parents has inspired me to start keeping a journal of memories my mother shares with me in preparation for the time when she will no longer be able to remember them by herself.


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Sharing A Meal

Written by Cindy Music

After this, Jesus went out and saw a tax collector by the name of Levi sitting at his tax booth. “Follow Me,” Jesus said to him and Levi got up, left everything and followed him. Then Levi held a great banquet for Jesus at his house, and a large crowd of tax collectors and others were eating with them. But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law who belonged to their sect complained to his disciples Why do you eat and drink with tax collectors? Jesus answered them, “It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.” Luke 5:27-31

 

Awhile back there was a question of the week about what your favorite meal is. I remember answering, “One shared with family or friends.”

There are a lot of dynamics that happen during a meal. Have you ever noticed that people seem to gather and linger where the food is being prepared and set out at a party? I remember as a little girl how my mom, grandmothers, aunts, and cousins would all be together in the kitchen at family gatherings. The conversations, laughter, and sharing of recipes. Mostly sharing a part of their lives with each other.

Meal time is where conversations about life happen. It’s where we share with each other stories, opinions, our thoughts on various topics, and sometimes the challenges we are facing. Dinner is when we often ask how work was for the day, what our children did at school, or schedules for the next day or week.

First dates often happen over food. It’s an opportunity for a couple to get to know some things about each other. A time to explore whether they want to go on a second date. People sometimes talk about their hopes and dreams for the future together.

We can learn a lot about ourselves and others when we sit down to share a meal. As kids we learn how to share by splitting the last roll with a sibling. It can be a time to experience something new, like squash. We learn what topics are appropriate to discuss when others are eating. It is where we learn to pray and give thanks to God for all we have received from Him.

What I have really noticed over the years is that sharing a meal with family and friends isn’t about the food served. It is about the relationships that are created and nurtured. It’s about spending time getting to know about someone else. Sharing in theirs joys, laughter, struggles, and disappointments. It is an opportunity to spend time investing in the lives of the people around you.

Jesus thought that eating with others was an important time. He shared meals with all kinds of people. He saw it as an opportunity to create relationships and share the gospel. He didn’t care about their past, how wealthy they were, or what kind of food they offered Him. It was always about getting personal with those around Him.

Last year left little opportunity for gathering in person with others. Even my introverted husband said recently that we need to have dinner with some friends because he had missed them. This year I am planning on more meals with family, friends, and new friends that I haven’t met yet.

 

We all have to eat, so why not do it together?

 


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Pastor Tony recommends reading:
 

A Firm Foundation

What does the future hold for The United Methodist Church? It is the question being asked all around our denomination. What should be the response to the competing visions and notable division within contemporary Methodism in North America? Can we explore the issues confronting us in a post-Christendom era without rupturing our relationships?

This carefully curated volume engages the deep heart questions of United Methodists and casts a compelling vision by trustworthy voices for dynamic faith. Contributors explore the power of classic ideas such as:

The Lordship of Jesus Christ Engaging scripture meaningfully The power of the Holy Spirit The promise of sanctification Living with undivided purpose Fostering dynamic discipleship The gift of the global church

This resource is a useful tool not only in navigating present challenges but in pursuing the future promise for the people called Methodists. The foundational principles that have guided Methodist thought from the beginning of John Wesley’s countercultural movement remain rich resources as we explore what it means to remain faithful disciples in the tradition of the Wesleys.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Address: 2100 Highway 150
Floyds Knobs, Indiana 47119
Phone: 812.944.2570
Email: wesley@wesleychapel.org