O U R   C H U R C H
 

We are a church family rooted in Christ and growing in grace.

At Wesley Chapel, it is our mission to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. We do this by focusing on four areas: Worship, Faith Development, Serving, and Generosity. We live together as people of faith to grow as disciples in each of these four areas.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
W H A T   W E   D O 

Our Mission

Serve the Church

When we serve we are being like Jesus. Jesus calls us to serve within our faith community so that we can grow in our faith and be equipped to go into the world to share the love of God with all people. The primary areas of Serve Here are Hospitality and Food Service. Serving at Wesley Chapel also includes other ministry areas such as Worship, Faith Development, and Facility Team just to name a few. There are always opportunities to serve and we would love to have you connected to Wesley Chapel through service.

 
 
 

Serve the City

We believe serving those around us is central to growing in our relationship with God. As disciples of Jesus Christ, we serve our local communities in Southern Indiana.
 
 

Serve the World

We are a church on mission to go into the world and share the hope of Jesus. Through local and global ministry partnerships, we are working diligently to be the hands and feet of God.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A B O U T
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New Here?

Join us for worship on Sundays at 8:30 am or 11:00 am. Our campus is located in the heart of Floyd County, Indiana. No matter who you are, or where you’ve been, we welcome you with open arms.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mission
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M I S S I O N
 
We are traveling this journey of faith together, developing the character of Jesus within, and sharing the love of God with our community.

 

Tony Alstott

Lead Pastor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
L E A D E R S H I P

Our Team

 
Tony Alstott
Lead Pastor
 
 
Cory Feuerbacher
Director of Worship +
Director of 20s/30s Ministry
 
 
Becky Perkins
Director of Faith 
 
 
Peter Williams
Associate Pastor
In charge of Youth and Mission
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
C H U R C H   M E D I A

Latest Sermon Series

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
W E S L E Y   C H A P E L   B L O G

Recent Articles

Renewing Your Mind While Watching Someone You Love Suffer

Written by Laura Swessel

Be joyful in hope, patient in affliction, faithful in prayer. Romans 12:12

Dementia is such a cruel and mysterious disease, especially for the family and friends of those afflicted with it.  Every phase presents you with a totally different person.  I have watched one of the most independent women – military veteran (one of the first female Air Force officers), young widow (losing her husband at age 48 when I was 19, and my brother was only 10 years old), brilliant musician, and role model – struggle with this disease for almost 5 years (probably longer as I look back and reflect on what I now know are early signs).  First, it seemed like she had a hard time concentrating, always starting something new before completing the task at hand, which led to a very cluttered household – atypical of the woman who raised me.  Then, it was minor forgetfulness – missing an appointment or not remembering an outing we had taken a few months back.  Now, recalling what she had for breakfast just a few hours later is a major task.  The mystery (or maybe the blessing) of what it has not robbed from her is her love for and ability to do crossword puzzles and Sodoku and (of course) to play the organ.

The purpose of Paul’s letter to the Romans is to give a summary of all that is required to live a life that is pleasing to God, especially in times of trouble.  Romans 12:12 gives three traits (joy, patience and faithfulness) and a context for each of them.  The second and third items are quite easy to relate to a caregiver’s concerns for a loved one suffering from dementia.  Patience in affliction is most definitely needed as your loved one struggles to come up with the correct words, tries to pull a memory out of muddled thoughts, or just simply attempts to complete a basic task.

Being “faithful in prayer” has taken on many different forms throughout this process.  First, there is the obvious in that I pray every day that medical advances will slow down the progression of the disease or at least lessen her anxiety.  Secondly, as I gradually took over her financial and medical decisions, I began (and continue) to pray for guidance.  Lastly, I pray for the ability to navigate the many changes in her abilities and also to find creative ways to encourage her and to accentuate the strengths and skills she still possesses.

Being “joyful in hope”, though, is probably the most difficult of the three.  What does that mean and how does it apply to someone who is dealing with a chronic, progressively debilitating disease like dementia?  For me, the hope lies in the hope that advancements in the treatment and prevention of dementia will mean that another generation will not have to suffer or watch a loved one suffer with the disease.

I’d like to close by including one other verse. 1 Thessalonians 5:18 says, “Give thanks in all circumstances”.  I am grateful that my mother’s dementia has not progressed as quickly as others.  I am also thankful for the incredible community of other caregivers I have met while visiting my mother – many of them not as fortunate as I am.  My mother’s long-term memory is still mostly intact.  So, we can reminisce about events and activities we have experienced together, and she can still tell me stories about her childhood and early adulthood.  Although, I wish I would have started this project earlier, the situation of other people who can no longer share these memories with their parents has inspired me to start keeping a journal of memories my mother shares with me in preparation for the time when she will no longer be able to remember them by herself.


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Sharing A Meal

Written by Cindy Music

After this, Jesus went out and saw a tax collector by the name of Levi sitting at his tax booth. “Follow Me,” Jesus said to him and Levi got up, left everything and followed him. Then Levi held a great banquet for Jesus at his house, and a large crowd of tax collectors and others were eating with them. But the Pharisees and the teachers of the law who belonged to their sect complained to his disciples Why do you eat and drink with tax collectors? Jesus answered them, “It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners to repentance.” Luke 5:27-31

 

Awhile back there was a question of the week about what your favorite meal is. I remember answering, “One shared with family or friends.”

There are a lot of dynamics that happen during a meal. Have you ever noticed that people seem to gather and linger where the food is being prepared and set out at a party? I remember as a little girl how my mom, grandmothers, aunts, and cousins would all be together in the kitchen at family gatherings. The conversations, laughter, and sharing of recipes. Mostly sharing a part of their lives with each other.

Meal time is where conversations about life happen. It’s where we share with each other stories, opinions, our thoughts on various topics, and sometimes the challenges we are facing. Dinner is when we often ask how work was for the day, what our children did at school, or schedules for the next day or week.

First dates often happen over food. It’s an opportunity for a couple to get to know some things about each other. A time to explore whether they want to go on a second date. People sometimes talk about their hopes and dreams for the future together.

We can learn a lot about ourselves and others when we sit down to share a meal. As kids we learn how to share by splitting the last roll with a sibling. It can be a time to experience something new, like squash. We learn what topics are appropriate to discuss when others are eating. It is where we learn to pray and give thanks to God for all we have received from Him.

What I have really noticed over the years is that sharing a meal with family and friends isn’t about the food served. It is about the relationships that are created and nurtured. It’s about spending time getting to know about someone else. Sharing in theirs joys, laughter, struggles, and disappointments. It is an opportunity to spend time investing in the lives of the people around you.

Jesus thought that eating with others was an important time. He shared meals with all kinds of people. He saw it as an opportunity to create relationships and share the gospel. He didn’t care about their past, how wealthy they were, or what kind of food they offered Him. It was always about getting personal with those around Him.

Last year left little opportunity for gathering in person with others. Even my introverted husband said recently that we need to have dinner with some friends because he had missed them. This year I am planning on more meals with family, friends, and new friends that I haven’t met yet.

 

We all have to eat, so why not do it together?

 


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How can the “Truth Set You Free”?

Written by Ron Van Tyle, U.S.M.C. Veteran
 

In John 8:31 -32 Jesus speaks to the believing Jews and says, “If you hold to My teaching, you are really My disciples. Then you will know the Truth, and the Truth will set you free.”

 

During this time of year we as a people and a nation are challenged to remember what these verses really mean. What is Truth? What is Freedom? Two different questions.

 

God says in His Word in 1 Peter 2:16, Live as free men, but do not use your freedom as a cover-up for evil; but live as bondservants to God.

 

Freedom must be practiced.

 

We must be free not because we claim freedom, but because we practice it. William Faulkner

 

Have we too much freedom? Have we so long ridiculed authority in the family, discipline in education, rules in art, decency in conduct, and law in the state that our liberation has brought us close to chaos in the family and the school, in morals, arts, ideas, and government? We forgot to make ourselves intelligent when we made ourselves free.  Will Durant

 

We proclaim ourselves as indeed we are: the defenders of freedom, wherever it continues to exist in the world. But we cannot defend freedom abroad by deserting it at home. Edward R. Morrow

 

Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. Martin Luther King Jr.

 

These few quotes were man’s thoughts and they give us the need to remember what God’s Word says to us about freedom. 
 
2 Corinthians 3:17, 17: Now the LORD is the Spirit, and where the Spirit of the LORD is, there is freedom.
 
Galatians 5:1,1: It is for freedom that Christ has set us free. Stand firm, then, and do not let yourselves be burdened again by a yoke of slavery. 
 
Galatians 5:13-14,13: You, my brothers and sisters, were called to be free. But do not use your freedom to indulge the flesh; rather, serve one another humbly in love. 14 For the entire law is fulfilled in keeping this one command: “Love your neighbor as yourself.”

 

James 1:25, 25: But whoever looks intently into the perfect law that gives freedom, and continues in it-not forgetting what they have heard, but doing it-they will be blessed in what they do.
 

 

The only way we can be free is to be totally free in Christ Jesus. ALL of God’s Word is Truth. Christ came to gives us the Truth and set us Free.

 

So as a nation “We The People” celebrate our Freedom’s, let us remember it is because of God’s Truth we are Free indeed!

 

Only though Christ Jesus can we be Free!


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Pastor Tony recommends reading:
 

A Firm Foundation

What does the future hold for The United Methodist Church? It is the question being asked all around our denomination. What should be the response to the competing visions and notable division within contemporary Methodism in North America? Can we explore the issues confronting us in a post-Christendom era without rupturing our relationships?

This carefully curated volume engages the deep heart questions of United Methodists and casts a compelling vision by trustworthy voices for dynamic faith. Contributors explore the power of classic ideas such as:

The Lordship of Jesus Christ Engaging scripture meaningfully The power of the Holy Spirit The promise of sanctification Living with undivided purpose Fostering dynamic discipleship The gift of the global church

This resource is a useful tool not only in navigating present challenges but in pursuing the future promise for the people called Methodists. The foundational principles that have guided Methodist thought from the beginning of John Wesley’s countercultural movement remain rich resources as we explore what it means to remain faithful disciples in the tradition of the Wesleys.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Contact Info

Address: 2100 Highway 150
Floyds Knobs, Indiana 47119
Phone: 812.944.2570
Email: wesley@wesleychapel.org