O U R   C H U R C H
 

We are a church family rooted in Christ and growing in grace.

At Wesley Chapel, it is our mission to make disciples of Jesus Christ for the transformation of the world. We do this by focusing on four areas: Worship, Faith Development, Serving, and Generosity. We live together as people of faith to grow as disciples in each of these four areas.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
W H A T   W E   D O 

Our Mission

Serve the Church

When we serve we are being like Jesus. Jesus calls us to serve within our faith community so that we can grow in our faith and be equipped to go into the world to share the love of God with all people. The primary areas of Serve Here are Hospitality and Food Service. Serving at Wesley Chapel also includes other ministry areas such as Worship, Faith Development, and Facility Team just to name a few. There are always opportunities to serve and we would love to have you connected to Wesley Chapel through service.

 
 
 

Serve the City

We believe serving those around us is central to growing in our relationship with God. As disciples of Jesus Christ, we serve our local communities in Southern Indiana.
 
 

Serve the World

We are a church on mission to go into the world and share the hope of Jesus. Through local and global ministry partnerships, we are working diligently to be the hands and feet of God.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
A B O U T
we are family.
 
 
JOIN A GROUP    
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Click for video

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

New Here?

Join us for worship on Sundays at 8:30 am or 11:00 am. Our campus is located in the heart of Floyd County, Indiana. No matter who you are, or where you’ve been, we welcome you with open arms.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Mission
& Vision
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Our
Ministries
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
M I S S I O N
 
We are traveling this journey of faith together, developing the character of Jesus within, and sharing the love of God with our community.

 

Tony Alstott

Lead Pastor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
L E A D E R S H I P

Our Team

 
Tony Alstott
Lead Pastor
 
 
Cory Feuerbacher
Director of Worship +
Director of 20s/30s Ministry
 
 
Becky Perkins
Director of Faith 
 
 
Peter Williams
Associate Pastor
In charge of Youth and Mission
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
C H U R C H   M E D I A

Latest Sermon Series

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
W E S L E Y   C H A P E L   B L O G

Recent Articles

Be Careful What You Ask For

Written by Diane Forler

 

“For I know the plans I have for you,” declares the Lord, “plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future.”


I’m a pretty smart cookie, right?  College graduate, great career, wife and Mom, 3 time homeowner, world traveler, pretty much able to sort things out.  Most of the time.  But sometimes I amaze myself with my apparent stupidity.  Have you ever wished for something, prayed, even begged God for something, finally taken it into your own hands and made it happen yourself…then looked around and said “Uh-Oh”?  Of course, we all have.  We think we know what we need, and don’t necessarily wait for God’s answer when we ask for it, so convinced are we that this is the only answer, path to happiness, or solution to a problem.  We pray, that’s who we are, but then we plunge ahead without really seeking His answer.

I made a big decision that way back in the 80s that led to a move to a different city, and changed the course of my life.  I had 2 really “good” reasons to be certain this was God’s will:  the end of a relationship, and missing my Mom and Dad.  I vaguely remember telling God that I wanted to move (run away?), where I wanted to move to, and basically saying “OK, God?”  So I found a job, made the move, and life went on.  Maybe it WAS His will, maybe He made the job and everything else fall into place.  It’s possible, but at the time I really don’t think I waited on His answer.  I just up and went!  I was glad to be closer to home, made some good friends, and even moved forward in my faith.  But I have always wondered, what would my life be like now if I had waited on Him then.   Would I have married someone different, married younger, never married?  Would my career have gone in a different direction?  What other aspects of my life did He want to do differently?

It is my belief that when we make decisions on our own, without seeking Him, God, in His loving way, slaps the palm of His hand to His forehead and says “My child, what were you thinking?” – and desperately wants to intervene, give us a push in the direction He knows we should take.  But then, being our ABBA “Daddy”, He lets us stumble, then helps us pick up the pieces.  So many times He has done that for me, and now in my 60s I think I am finally catching on that taking the time to wait for Him is a really good idea.

Please don’t misunderstand, I do not regret my marriage and cannot imagine life without the exact kids I have.  I love my family deeply.  But it breaks my heart that they do not share my spiritual journey with me.  Maybe if I had sought His will better, my family would be part of my spiritual life.  I still know He has a plan for them, loves them and wants them for His own, and my prayer is for Him to use me or whomever or whatever He chooses to reach them and bring them closer to Him.  I am determined to keep praying and seeking His will until that happens in His way.  I am determined not to get in His way this time.

People are rallying in large groups today for causes that may or may not get them what they really want.  I just wonder how much God-seeking is going on, and how much people on both sides of these issues are only giving God lip service, praying but then plunging ahead without really seeking His guidance.  Sweeping changes are probably needed, and I hope that His will is a part of the changes we are rallying for. 

 2 Chronicles 7:14 (“If my people…”) is quoted a lot these days.  Social issues that fly in the face of God’s word are not going to align with His will, and we as His Church must lead in the quest for His truth and His will in our world today.  We must love all people, meet people where they are, accept the differences we are going to see in our diverse society.  But when we are looking to set priorities and truly seek His will, we cannot compromise in our alignment to His word.  It is a challenging time for our Church and especially for our leaders, as we try to navigate the changes in our world.  It is my prayer that we seek, wait for, and follow His will unwaveringly so that His will is fulfilled.


Read more

The Biggest Blessing

Written by Stephanie Taggart
 

In 1 Kings 19:19-21 we read about the call of Elisha.  While he was out plowing, Elijah came up to him and threw a cloak around him (meaning Elijah is passing the torch to Elisha – anointing him into his prophetic office).  Elisha asks, “Let me kiss my father and mother goodbye and then I will come with you.”  It was important for Elisha to say goodbye to his parents as he was leaving to become a prophet. It would be a long time before he would see them again, if ever.

I couldn’t imagine being Elisha’s mother.  While the Bible doesn’t mention her perspective, I bet she was full of emotions.  I’m sure she was worried and sad, while at the same time she was feeling proud of what he had been called to do and what he was taking on.  

The biggest blessing ever bestowed upon me is that of being a parent.  It is also the hardest thing that that God has ever entrusted me to do.   We start out having children that rely on us for everything.  They can’t do anything for themselves and we are in charge of their every need.   They get a little older and we teach them how to do things for themselves.  Eventually, they enter young adulthood, and their independence is calling to them.  

As a new parent to this stage of life (young adulthood) I am realizing that this is the most difficult stage of parenting that I have done so far.  Proverbs 22:6 (NIV) says, “Start children off on the way they should go, and even when they are old, they will not turn from it,” I am holding onto this verse tightly, trusting that we have given our child the skills, lessons, and morals she will need to live her best life. We pray she will hang on to the love of God and the faith that we have brought her up with.

To be very honest, I am struggling with the balance between parenting and letting her soar.  Isn’t she still that little girl running through the house asking me to play dolls?  Isn’t she still the girl who wanted to sleep with me on the weekends and watch movies? Then it hits me: no she isn’t. She is a young adult who is trying to find her way in the world.  To do that, I have to let her go and I have to let her figure that out for herself. I have to let her know the struggle of making mistakes and the joy of success.

I know this isn’t even close to the level of Elisha’s mother watching her son leave knowing she may never see him again, but every time we let them fly, they go a little farther. Eventually, she won’t be back to our house and she will be living life on her own. One verse I have tried to instill in her is, “Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.” Proverbs 3:5-6

The job of being a parent is never done, no matter how old our kids are. I can’t tell you how many times I have called my mom asking her advice on what to do and how to handle certain things and issues that come up. I am constantly asking for advice on what to say or do in certain situations. What my daughter needs from me now is much bigger because the pressure on her is greater. She needs our time, our money, our counsel, and, of course, our prayers. 

Lately, I have felt like a robot praying for her – praying for the same things over and over. It hit me like a ton of bricks yesterday, her life isn’t the same thing over and over and her struggles aren’t the same thing over and over. I need to change my prayers. So, I got on the computer and looked up, “How to pray for my young adult”.   

I found 5 new ways to pray for her:

  1. Pray that she walks in wisdom – Ephesians 5:15-16
  2. Pray that she grows up – Luke 2:52
  3. Pray that she hangs out with wise friends – 1 Corinthians 15:33
  4. Pray that she seeks God – Jeremiah 29:12-13
  5. Pray that she embraces God’s plan for her life – Psalm 138:8

 

I know this will continue to be a hard time to parent, but I will be more diligent about praying for her and her future. I will continue to be there for her, and I will continue to remind her that I love her, and God loves her.  I will continue to pray for her constantly. I know God has great things in store for her and I can’t wait to see her flourish! 

 

I have a request from me to you. I would ask that as you say your prayers, say a prayer for all the young adults in the church.  Prayer is powerful!

 

 

Read more

Asking Forgiveness Instead of Permission is Not Easier

Written by Tony Alstott

“It’s easier to ask forgiveness instead of permission,” has become a common statement that I first heard years ago.  I have been hearing it more and more lately to the point that it seems to have become a part of our American culture.  The first time I heard it I immediately felt uncomfortable.  I did not stop to analyze why until recently.

 

First, the statement implies that permission should be asked before proceeding with the action you plan to do.  Your action somehow crosses a boundary that would be a concern to the person you would eventually need to ask forgiveness from.  Not asking permission when you know you should ask permission is a willful and premeditated act.  You have thought about it beforehand and you made the decision not to ask permission.  It would be better to ask permission first rather than taking the easy way.

 

Second, it is deceptive.  When you do something without asking permission you are going behind someone’s back to accomplish something you want to do.  You do it without the person knowing about it until it is already done.  Deception is a form of lying by withholding the truth. It would be better to be honest up front by asking permission instead of being deceptive and then later asking for forgiveness.

 

Third, the course of action creates distrust.  You have the opportunity to be trustworthy by asking permission before moving forward with your intended action.  By intentionally not asking permission first, you have created distrust.  It would be better to ask permission to create on ongoing relationship of trust instead of moving forward with your action. 

 

Fourth, you devalue the person when you choose not to ask permission.  You have decided that what you want to accomplish is more important than the person whose permission you need to ask.  It would be better to ask permission to show that you value the person more than the task you want to accomplish.

 

Fifth, when you ask forgiveness for something when you could have asked permission first, your apology is empty.  You really aren’t sorry for what you did.  You are glad you did it.  You feel justified in doing it.  You did it without consideration of the person you would hurt or the boundary you would cross.  You are really not asking forgiveness at all.  It would be better to care enough to ask permission.

 

God has called me to point people to God and point Christians to the mission field.  Forgiveness is an important part of Christianity.  Jesus forgave us.  We are to forgive one another.  When we ask someone to forgive us, there is an expectation that they must forgive us if we are Christian.  When we willingly cross a boundary without asking permission, with the intent of asking forgiveness, what are we doing?  Are we taking advantage of the person knowing that they must forgive as Jesus forgave?  Are we being selfish, seeking our own gain, at the expense of others?  Is it really easier to ask forgiveness than permission?  Is taking the easy way the goal of the Christian believer?  Perhaps asking forgiveness instead of permission may be easier for the short term but not for the long term.  When we take advantage of other people through deceptive means, I would say that it is harder rather than easier.  It’s easier to ask permission than it is to mend a broken relationship.  It’s easier to build trust than it is to earn the trust of the one you have deceived.  

 

Jesus said to love God and love one another.  Asking forgiveness instead of asking permission is not how we love one another.  Peter encourages us to “love one another deeply from the heart” (1 Peter 1:22). We love one another by being honest, by respecting boundaries, and by valuing people as God’s handiwork. 

 


Read more

 
 
 
 
Pastor Tony recommends reading:
 

A Firm Foundation

What does the future hold for The United Methodist Church? It is the question being asked all around our denomination. What should be the response to the competing visions and notable division within contemporary Methodism in North America? Can we explore the issues confronting us in a post-Christendom era without rupturing our relationships?

This carefully curated volume engages the deep heart questions of United Methodists and casts a compelling vision by trustworthy voices for dynamic faith. Contributors explore the power of classic ideas such as:

The Lordship of Jesus Christ Engaging scripture meaningfully The power of the Holy Spirit The promise of sanctification Living with undivided purpose Fostering dynamic discipleship The gift of the global church

This resource is a useful tool not only in navigating present challenges but in pursuing the future promise for the people called Methodists. The foundational principles that have guided Methodist thought from the beginning of John Wesley’s countercultural movement remain rich resources as we explore what it means to remain faithful disciples in the tradition of the Wesleys.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Stay connected!

Subscribe to our weekly email where we will keep you in the loop with current events, groups, and Wesley Chapel opportunities. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
C O N T A C T   F O R M

Send us a Message

 
 
 
  
L O C A T I O N

Contact Info

Address: 2100 Highway 150
Floyds Knobs, Indiana 47119
Phone: 812.944.2570
Email: wesley@wesleychapel.org